Memphis, TN

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Previous GTCA City 2020

Overview

The church had its beginnings in the early 1970s when several saints migrated to Memphis. Brother Lee and his coworkers recognized that Memphis, with its central location and large population, needed a lampstand. In the mid-1980s, after a period of “consolidations” and saints moving away, something began to sprout in Memphis again.

Then in the late 1990s, the Lord initiated migration again, and saints from 18 different localities migrated to Memphis. Today, the church numbers around 80 active members, of which 50 (on average) regularly attend meetings on the Lord’s Day.

This migration will be the third migration to Memphis in 50 years. Once again, the church in Memphis shall willingly and wonderfully receive migrating saints with open arms, full of expectation to see what the Lord will do.

Location, Climate, and Health

Memphis is a racially diverse, older city on the Mississippi River in southwest Tennessee. (There are 65 very old and beautiful buildings in Memphis on the National Historic Registry.)

Memphis averages 218 sunny days per year (the US average is 205 sunny days). Memphis gets 54.1 inches of rain on average per year and averages 3 inches of snow per year. Summer highs occur in July, averaging 90.9°F; winter lows occur in January, with temperatures averaging 30.3°F. April, May, and October are the most pleasant months in Memphis, while July and August are the least comfortable months. March is the rainiest month with 10.7 days of rain, and August is the driest month with only 6.4 rainy days. Memphis has 108.4 rainy days annually, fewer than most places in Tennessee. The rainiest season is summer when it rains 28% of the time, and the driest is autumn, with a 22% chance of a rainy day.

Memphis is a healthcare city with a history that dates back to 1911 when the University of Tennessee medical college was founded here. Now the University of Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC) is the epicenter for medical education across the state and region, offering degrees in medicine, nursing, dentistry, pharmacy, graduate health sciences, and health professions. Memphis is also the home of St. Jude’s Children’s Research.

Hospital, which is leading how the world understands, treats and defeats childhood cancer and other life-threatening diseases. US News and World Report rank St. Jude’s Cancer Research Hospital #1 in treating children with cancer. Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital, Regional One Health Center (home to the only Level 1 trauma center within a 150-mile radius), the Veteran’s Administration system, and many other healthcare institutions in Memphis are recognized for their excellence.

Demographics

The Memphis metro area is a good place to live. The core city offers almost everything you would find in Birmingham, Nashville, or Austin. The people are known to be kind, down-to-earth, and respectful. There are exceptions, but Southern hospitality has roots in Memphis. The cityscape is both historical and somewhat modern. The cost of living is lower than average compared to other top 50 metro areas. The quality of life, especially in the suburbs, and the positive direction of the area make the Memphis metro area a good place to live for those looking for a good mixture of urban and rural living. Memphis has a diverse population (63.4% Black, 29.2% White, and 7.4% other).

Economy/Employment

Memphis is home to the headquarters of some of the world’s best-known companies, including three Fortune 500 companies (FedEx, Autozone, and International Paper). More than 100 other Fortune 500 companies have operations in Memphis, and these companies are making headlines. Memphis tops the list of places where millennials are putting down roots. Additionally, according to a national survey, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital is the number one dream job for Gen Z.

Millions of people come to Memphis for its food, music, history, and business-friendly environment. Low tax rates, infrastructure support, an attractive cost of living, a skilled workforce, and affordable real estate create an ideal business climate. Forbes Magazine ranked Memphis fourth on its list of “The Happiest Cities to Work in Right Now,” and a study by WalletHub ranked it seventh in the nation for entrepreneurs. Memphis offers career opportunities for a diverse, metropolitan workforce supported by a host of world-class higher education institutions, including the largest community college in Tennessee, several vocational and technical training facilities, and nationally-ranked public and private school systems—not to mention low commute times and high quality of life outside the office.

Blue Oval City is a planned automotive assembly complex in west Tennessee. It will be the largest, most advanced, and most efficient automotive production campus in Ford Motor Company’s history. The campus will include a Ford assembly plant, a supplier park, and a battery manufacturing and recycling plant in partnership with SK Innovation. The site will become a vertically integrated, carbon-neutral ecosystem with key suppliers and battery manufacturing on the same campus where Ford will assemble next-generation all-electric F-Series trucks. Ford expects the Blue Oval City automotive assembly complex to be operational in 2025. Blue Oval City will be located on the Memphis Regional Megasite in Stanton, Tennessee, which spans 6 square miles, covering 3,600 acres in Haywood County and Fayette County. Ford and SK have plans to create 5,800 direct jobs on site.

Transportation

Memphis Area Transit Authority (MATA) buses are a standard mode of transportation throughout the city. These buses transport more than 7.2 million people around the Memphis area every year, and they’re a solid option for getting around town. They are cost-effective at only $1.75 per ride (less for students, seniors, and individuals with disabilities).

The logistics industry provides air travel (Memphis International Airport [MEM] is home to the FedEx Express global hub). Nonstop FedEx destinations from Memphis include cities across the continental United States, Canada, Europe, the Middle East, Asia, and South America. From 1993 to 2009, Memphis had the most significant airport cargo operations worldwide. To this day, MEM remains the busiest cargo airport in the United States and the Western Hemisphere.

On the passenger side, MEM averages over 80 passenger flights per day. Top destinations include Atlanta, Charlotte, Chicago, Dallas, Houston, Denver, and Orlando.

Interests

Memphis combines southern tradition and hospitality with modern amenities. Many great dining options include BBQ, Italian, Indian, Chinese, Hispanic, German, and soul food restaurants.

Shelby Farms, located right outside Memphis proper, provides paddle boat rentals, row boat rentals, zip lines, walking/hiking trails, cycling trails, horseback riding, paintball, and disc golf. It also has a cafe, a long river walk (2.5 miles), swings, benches, and Adirondack rocking chairs overlooking the 80-acre Hyde Lake, stocked with bass, catfish, bream, bluegill, and buffalo fish.

Museums are found throughout Memphis: the National Civil Rights Museum, the Pink Palace and Planetarium, Graceland, Stax Museum of American Soul Music, Slave Haven Underground Railroad Museum, Dixon Gallery & Gardens, Blues Hall of Fame Museum, Children’s Museum of Memphis, the Metal Museum, Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, and the Mississippi River Museum at Mud Island.

Memphis is home to the Memphis Grizzlies of the NBA, who play at the FedEx Forum. The Memphis Redbirds are a Triple-A affiliate of the St. Louis Cardinals and play baseball at Autozone Park. The University of Memphis has a successful football program and a highly ranked men’s basketball team. In addition, according to a 2019 USA Today poll, the Memphis Zoo ranks among the top 10 zoos in the nation.

The Memphis-in-May International Festival is an international BBQ festival in which people from all over the United States come to “pit” their BBQ skills one against another.

College Campuses

The University of Memphis
The University of Memphis is a 112-acre campus in the city’s center. Its first college buildings, which today comprise the main campus, were erected in the early 20th century. Most of the buildings that house the arts and humanities departments and the physics and astronomy departments are located in the original areas of campus. There are 21,000 students currently enrolled.

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The northwestern area of the main campus includes the Fogelman College of Business and Economics, the Fogelman Executive Center (a major conference center for regional executives visiting the University of Memphis), and the FedEx Institute of Technology, a major research contributor in the areas of supply chain management, nanotechnology, robotics, and intelligent systems.

The School of Law at the University of Memphis is housed in a 5-story former federal building located in downtown Memphis. As of 2010, the building is owned entirely by the university. The building is on the National Historic Registry, one of 65 Memphis buildings on the registry. It was formerly a customs house, a post office, and a courthouse at different times. The building’s location on a natural bluff overlooking the Mississippi River affords it magnificent westerly views of the river, Mud Island, and Arkansas.

Rhodes College
Rhodes College is a private liberal arts college in Memphis. There are approximately 2,000 students enrolled, and its beautiful campus sits on a 123-acre wooded site in the city’s historic midtown neighborhood. Often cited for its beauty, the campus design is notable for its stone Collegiate Gothic buildings, 13 of which are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. In 2017, The Princeton Review named Rhodes the #1 Most Beautiful College Campus in America in its edition of The Best 381 Colleges.

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LeMoyne-Owen College
LeMoyne–Owen College (LOC, or simply “LeMoyne”) is a private historically black college (HBCU) affiliated with the United Church of Christ and located in Memphis. Founded in 1862, LOC has a current enrollment of 945 students and offers bachelor’s degrees in 22 different areas of study. The key majors are Business Management, Computer Science, Education, Special Education, Biology, Sociology, and Social Work.

Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC)
As Tennessee’s only public, statewide, academic health system, the mission of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC) is to bring the benefits of the health sciences to the achievement and maintenance of human health, with a focus on the citizens of Tennessee and the region, by pursuing an integrated program of education, research, clinical care, and public service. The main UTHSC campus in Memphis offers a broad range of postgraduate and selected baccalaureate training opportunities. It includes six colleges: Dentistry, Graduate Health Sciences, Health Professions, Medicine, Nursing, and Pharmacy. Founded in 1911, during its more than 100 years, UT Health Science Center has educated and trained more than 57,000 healthcare professionals in academic settings and healthcare facilities across the state.

Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC)
As Tennessee’s only public, statewide, academic health system, the mission of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC) is to bring the benefits of the health sciences to the achievement and maintenance of human health, with a focus on the citizens of Tennessee and the region, by pursuing an integrated program of education, research, clinical care, and public service. The main UTHSC campus in Memphis offers a broad range of postgraduate and selected baccalaureate training opportunities. It includes six colleges: Dentistry, Graduate Health Sciences, Health Professions, Medicine, Nursing, and Pharmacy. Founded in 1911, during its more than 100 years, UT Health Science Center has educated and trained more than 57,000 healthcare professionals in academic settings and healthcare facilities across the state.

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Schools Grades K-12

How good are the schools in Memphis, TN? Memphis encompasses 26 public elementary, middle, and high schools. Memphis also has 97 private schools. Forty-three high schools are recognized in U.S. News & World Report’s Best High Schools rankings. Middle College High School, Collierville High School, Houston High School, White Station High School, and Germantown High School, to name a few. Many parents homeschool their children, even through high school. However, there are many renowned private schools located in Memphis, and many have scholarships available. Some programs offer in-school advanced placement classes during regular school hours, such as the CLUE program (Creative Learning in a Unique Environment) and the honors program. Students’ grades must meet the criteria set by these programs to be eligible. According to Niche.com, the top 24 elementary schools in the Memphis area are located in neighboring school districts such as Lakeland, Germantown, and Collierville Schools. Shelby County middle and high schools are ranked higher than elementary schools.

Living in Memphis

What’s the cost of living in Memphis, TN? Memphis has a relatively low cost of living for a large metro area. Rent prices and mortgage expenses are considerably lower than the national average. Expenses for food and services are also significantly lower than in other major regions, especially in the more rural areas that spread out beyond the metro region.

Who lives in Memphis, TN?

Affordable living costs make it easy for families and retirees to call the Memphis region home. And the metro area’s colleges and universities bring in a younger demographic.

Memphis, TN, Quick Stats

Metro Population 1,343,150

Median Home Price $256,650

Median Monthly Rent $944

Median Age 36.5 years old

Average Annual Salary $46,980

Unemployment Rate 9.3%

Average Commute 24.4 minutes

Average High Temps 72.38° F

Average Low Temps 53.56° F

Average Rainfall 53.68 inches